Inner Strength Achieved with Yoga Goddess Pose

Inner Strength Achieved with Yoga Goddess Pose

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Inner Strength Achieved with Yoga Goddess Pose. This is a simple pose that lets you harness energy and tone your core muscles. The pose is known to help women draw power from their most feminine side. Maintain breathing while practicing this pose and the others in the sequence below.

Inner Strength Achieved with Yoga Goddess Pose

Every woman has that Goddess whim. Practicing yoga gives you the opportunity to enhance that feeling. You can experience willpower, courage, domination. And both inner and outer strength with the “Goddess Sequence.” These 15 poses practiced in sequence will bring you that feeling of inner power.

Inner Strength Poses to Release Your Goddess

1. Goddess Pose

Cautions: Do not practice this pose if you have a recent or chronic injury to the legs, hips, back, or shoulders. Always work within your own range of limits and abilities. If you have any medical concerns, talk to your doctor before practicing yoga.

  1. Begin standing in Mountain Pose (Tadasana) at the top of your mat with your arms at your sides. Bring your hands to rest on your hips.
  2. Turn to the right and step your feet wide apart, about four feet. Turn your toes out slightly, so they point to the corners of your mat.
  3. On an exhalation, bend your knees directly over your toes and lower your hips into a squat. Work toward bringing your thighs parallel to the floor, but do not force yourself into the squat.
  4. Extend your arms out to the sides at shoulder-height with your palms facing down. Then, spiral your thumbs up toward the ceiling, so your palms face forward. Bend your elbows and point your fingertips toward the ceiling. Your upper arms and forearms should be at a 90-degree angle.
  5. Tuck your tailbone in and press your hips forward as you draw your thighs back. Keep your knees in line with your toes. Soften your shoulders. Gaze at the horizon.
  6. Hold for up to 10 breaths. To release, slowly return your hands to your hips. Keep your spine upright. Inhale as you press firmly into your feet and straighten your legs. Step your feet together and come back to the top of your mat in Mountain Pose.

2. Wild Thing

  1. Begin in Plank with your shoulders stacked directly over your wrists. And your legs active and engaged. Bring your feet and legs together to touch and walk your right hand into the center of your mat.
  2. On an exhale, bring your weight into your right hand. Roll onto the outer edge of your right foot. Extend your left arm straight up toward the ceiling to come into Side Plank. Keep your feet stacked on top of one another and your hips lifted.
  3. From Side Plank, step your left foot back behind you with the left knee bent. Place the ball of your left foot on the ground.
  4. Begin to soften your shoulder blades and allow your upper back to curl into a backbend. Inhaling deeply, extend your lifted arm forward and down. Allow the head and neck to hang softly. Press down through the feet and the right hand to find more buoyancy in the hips. Remember that what goes down, must come up!
  5. Take 5 full, deep breaths in your expression of the pose. Begin to send your gaze back to the center of your mat and step back to Plank. Whenever you feel ready, repeat on the other side.

3. Dancer Pose

Cautions: Do not practice this pose if you have a recent or chronic ankle or low back injury. Do not do this pose if you are experiencing low blood pressure, dizziness, migraines, or insomnia. Always work within your own range of limits and abilities. If you have any medical concerns, talk to your doctor before practicing yoga.

  1. Begin standing in Mountain Pose with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Shift your weight onto your left foot.
  2. Bend your right knee and bring your right heel toward your right buttock. Reach your right hand down and clasp your right foot’s inner ankle. You can also loop a strap around the top of your right foot, and then hold onto the strap with your right hand.
  3. Draw your knees together.
  4. Reach your left arm overhead, pointing your fingertips toward the ceiling. Face your palm to the right.
  5. Fix your gaze softly at an unmoving spot in front of you. Make sure your left kneecap and toes continue to point directly forward.
  6. When you feel steady and comfortable, begin to press your right foot away from your body. Simultaneously lean your torso slightly forward. Keep your chest lifted. Continue reaching your left hand’s fingertips up toward the ceiling.
  7. Raise your right foot as high as you can. Bring your left thigh parallel to the floor, or higher if possible. At the same time, press your tailbone toward the floor to avoid compressing your lower back. Do not let your right knee splay open to the side.
  8. If you are comfortable and steady here, you may go into the advanced pose. Swivel your right elbow forward and then up, so it points toward the ceiling.
  9. You will need to drop your right shoulder slightly as you make this adjustment. Hug your right bicep toward your right ear. Your right forearm should now be reaching overhead and behind your body to hold onto your foot or the strap.
  10. Bend your left elbow and reach your left hand back to hold onto your foot or the strap. Draw both arms inward toward your head as you keep your shoulder blades pressing down your back.
  11. As you press your raised foot back, keep your chest lifting. Do not let your torso drop forward. Keep your pelvis square and keep your right knee drawn in toward the midline of your body.
  12. If you are holding a strap, walk your hands down the strap toward your foot. Do this until you can clasp the top of your foot with both hands.

#4 – 6 Inner Strength Poses to Release Your Goddess

4. Mermaid Pose

Cautions: Do not do if you have a recent or chronic injury to the shoulder, knee, ankle, or sacroiliac. Avoid if you have high blood pressure, low blood pressure or heart disease. Those with spine or back injuries. Only attempt this pose under the guidance of an experienced and knowledgeable instructor. Always work within your own range of limits and abilities. If you have any medical concerns, talk to your doctor before practicing yoga.

  1. Begin in Downward-Facing Dog. Spread your fingers, lengthen your spine, lift your hips. Drawdown firmly through your heels.
  2. On an exhalation, bend your right knee and bring it forward between your hands. Place your right ankle on the floor near your left wrist, and your right knee near your right wrist. Extend your left leg behind you, keeping your kneecap and the top of your foot on the floor.
  3. Press through your fingertips as you lift your torso away from your thigh. Lengthening the front of your body. Release your tailbone back toward your heels. This is One-Legged King Pigeon Pose.
  4. Drawdown through your right leg’s shin. Balance your weight between your right and left hips. Pull your thighs slightly inward toward the midline of your body.
  5. Use the strength and stability of your legs to help lift and extend your spine even higher.
  6. Rest your right hand gently on your right thigh. Bend your left knee. Reach your left hand back and clasp the inner edge of your left foot. Then slowly bring your left foot to the inside of your left forearm.
  7. Glide your foot closer toward your body until your foot rests in the crease of your left elbow. Press your foot firmly into your arm to activate your legs.
  8. With your spine long and extended, lift your right arm overhead. Bend your right elbow and reach your right forearm behind your head. Clasp your left hand.
  9. Square your hips and torso toward the front of your mat as much as possible. Press through your feet and legs to help activate your pelvic core and lift your spine.
  10. Gaze up toward the sky. Keep your face and eyes soft.

5. Breathing/Savasana Exercises

  1. Lying on your back, let the arms and legs drop open, with the arms about 45 degrees from the side of your body. Make sure you are warm and comfortable if you need to place blankets under or over your body.
  2. Close the eyes, and take slow deep breaths through the nose. Allow your whole body to become soft and heavy, letting it relax into the floor. As the body relaxes, feel the whole body rising and falling with each breath.
  3. Scan the body from the toes to the fingers to the crown of the head. Look for tension, tightness and contracted muscles. Consciously release and relax any areas that you find. If you need to, rock or wiggle parts of your body from side to side to encourage further release.
  4. Release all control of the breath, the mind, and the body. Let your body move deeper and deeper into a state of total relaxation.
  5. Stay in Shavasana for 5 to 15 minutes.
  6. To release: slowly deepen the breath. Wiggle the fingers and toes. Reach the arms over your head and stretch the whole body. Exhale, bend the knees into the chest and roll over to one side coming into a fetal position. When you are ready, slowly inhale up to a seated position.

6. Boat Pose

  1. Begin seated with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor, hands resting beside your hips. Draw your awareness inward and focus on your breath. Allow your inhalations and exhalations to be smooth, calm, and even.
  2. Keep your spine straight. Lean back slightly and lift your feet, bringing your shins parallel to the floor.
  3. Draw in your low back, lift your chest, and lengthen the front of your torso. Then, extend your arms forward, in line with your shoulders with your palms facing each other.
  4. Balance on your sit bones, keeping your spine straight. Take care not to let your lower back sag or chest collapse.
  5. Lengthen the front of your torso from your pubic bone to the top of your sternum. The lower belly (the area below your navel) should be firm and somewhat flat, but not hard or thick.
  6. With an exhalation, straighten your legs to a 45-degree angle from the ground. Bring your body into a “V” shape.
  7. Keep your breath easy, steady, and smooth. Focus your awareness within. Soften your eyes and your face. Gaze at your toes.
  8. Spread your shoulder blades wide. Reach out through your fingers, engaging your hands. Stay in the pose for five breaths, gradually working up to one minute. To release the pose, exhale as you lower your legs and hands to the floor.

#7 – 9 Inner Strength Poses to Release Your Goddess

7. Child’s Pose

    1. Kneel on the floor. Touch your big toes together and sit on your heels, then separate your knees about as wide as your hips.
    2. Exhale and lay your torso down between your thighs. Broaden your sacrum across the back of your pelvis and narrow your hip points toward the navel. So that they nestle down onto the inner thighs. Lengthen your tailbone away from the back of the pelvis. Lift the base of your skull away from the back of your neck.
    3. Lay your hands on the floor alongside your torso, palms up. Release the fronts of your shoulders toward the floor. Feel how the weight of the front shoulders pulls the shoulder blades wide across your back.
    4. Balasana is a resting pose. Stay anywhere from 30 seconds to a few minutes. Beginners can also use Balasana to get a taste of a deep forward bend, where the torso rests on the thighs. Stay in the pose from 1 to 3 minutes.
    5. To come up, lengthen the front torso. Then with an inhalation lift from the tailbone as it presses down and into the pelvis.

8. Crescent Lunge

  1. Stand in mountain pose.
  2. Transition to a downward facing dog.
  3. Step your right foot forward between your hands.
  4. Raise your torso as you inhale.
  5. Do not overarch your lower back.
  6. Keep your front shin vertical.
  7. Draw your front ribs down and into your torso.
  8. Release the pose.

9. Crescent Lunge On One Knee

  1. Stand in mountain pose
  2. Transition to the downward facing dog.
  3. Step your right foot forward between your hands.
  4. Raise your torso as you inhale.
  5. Do not overarch your lower back.
  6. Keep your front shin vertical.
  7. Draw your front ribs down and into your torso.
  8. Release the pose.

#10 – 12 Inner Strength Poses to Release Your Goddess

10. Eagle Pose

  1. Stand in Tadasana. Bend your knees slightly. Lift your left foot up and, balancing on your right foot, cross your left thigh over the right. Point your left toes toward the floor, press the foot back, and then hook the top of the foot behind the lower right calf. Balance on the right foot.
  2. Stretch your arms straight forward, parallel to the floor. Spread your scapulas wide across the back of your torso. Cross the arms in front of your torso so that the right arm is above the left, then bend your elbows. Snug the right elbow into the crook of the left, and raise the forearms perpendicular to the floor. The backs of your hands should be facing each other.
  3. Press the right hand to the right and the left hand to the left, so that the palms are now facing each other. The thumb of the right hand should pass in front of the little finger of the left. Press the palms together (as much as is possible for you). Lift your elbows up, and stretch the fingers toward the ceiling.
  4. Stay for 15 to 30 seconds, then unwind the legs and arms and stand in Tadasana again. Repeat for the same length of time with the arms and legs reversed.

11. Forward Fold

  1. Stand in Tadasana, hands on hips. Exhale and bend forward from the hip joints, not from the waist. As you descend draw the front torso out of the groins and open the space between the pubis and top sternum. The emphasis is on lengthening the front torso as you move more fully into the position.
  2. If possible, do this with your knees straight. Bring your palms or fingertips to the floor slightly in front of or beside your feet. Or bring your palms to the backs of your ankles. If this isn’t possible, cross your forearms and hold your elbows. Press the heels firmly into the floor and lift the sitting bones toward the ceiling. Turn the top thighs slightly inward.
  3. With each inhalation in the pose, lift and lengthen the front torso just slightly. With each exhalation release a little more fully into the forward bend. In this way, the torso oscillates almost imperceptibly with the breath. Let your head hang from the root of the neck, which is deep in the upper back, between the shoulder blades.
  4. Uttanasana can be used as a resting position between the standing poses. Stay in the pose for 30 seconds to 1 minute. It can also be practiced as a pose in itself.
  5. Don’t roll the spine to come up. Instead, bring your hands back onto your hips and reaffirm the length of the front torso. Then press your tailbone down and into the pelvis and come up on an inhalation with a long front torso.

12. Runner’s Lunge

  1. Begin in a plank position with hands directly below shoulders.
  2. Step your right foot forward to the outer edge of your mat next to your right pinky finger.
  3. Relax through your hips and back, letting them sink toward the ground.
  4. Breathe and hold for 30 seconds. Switch sides.

#13 – 15 Inner Strength Poses to Release Your Goddess

13. Side Plank Scoop

  1. Begin in a full side plank position with right hand below the shoulder. Left-arm reaching high above left shoulder and legs long. (Modify by placing bottom knee onto mat if needed)
  2. Tighten abdominals and slowly scoop left arm under the body. Follow with your eyes until you see behind you.
  3. Slowly reach your left hand back to start position.
  4. Repeat for a desired number of repetitions and switch sides.

14. Seated Pose (or Seated Lotus)

  1. Sit on the floor with your legs extended, spine straight, and arms resting at your sides. This is Seated Staff Pose (Dandasana).
  2. Bend your right knee and hug it to your chest. Then, bring your right ankle to the crease of your left hip so the sole of your right foot faces the sky. The top of your foot should rest on your hip crease.
  3. Then, bend your left knee. Cross your left ankle over the top of your right shin. The sole of your left foot should also face upwards, and the top of your foot and ankle should rest on your hip crease.
  4. Draw your knees as close together as possible. Press your groins toward the floor and sit up straight.

15. Side Plank

  1. Begin in Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Lower your hips and shift your weight forward to come into Plank
  2. Pose (the top of a push-up): Palms flat, body extended, with your legs reaching through your heels.
  3. Step your feet together and press your weight down through your right hand and forearm. Then, roll your body to the right, balancing on the outer edge of your right foot. Stack your left foot on top of your right foot and keep your legs straight.
  4. Beginners can lower their right knee and shin to the mat. Keep their hips lifted while building strength in the arms and torso.
  5. Extend your left arm to the sky. Reach through your fingertips as you lift your hips and firm the triceps of both arms. Feel the muscles across your shoulder blades flex. Firm your thighs, and press through your heels into the floor.
  6. Bring your body into one straight line. Gaze at your top thumb. Press down through your bottom index finger.
  7. Hold for up to 30 seconds. Exhale as you slowly return to Plank Pose, then into Downward-Facing Dog. Repeat on the opposite side.

 



Conclusion

Feeling like a Goddess is not about a perfect body. Nor is it about being able to do the most difficult poses or being an experienced yoga user. The goddess sequence will give you a feeling of strength as you practice. And it will remain with you long after they have been completed. Get that Goddess Air of Confidence and never let it go.


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